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hypertext

This tag is associated with 6 posts

Response: Hypertextuality: Moving Forward or Moving Back? (Revision)

Ilana Snyder makes a strong, compelling argument about the changes in textuality and the growing values of hypertext in the chapter “Reconceiving Textuality.” However, there are negative and opposing aspects to hypertext, which she does not consider. Snyder disregards the value of authorial intent. Although, hypertextuality is appreciated because it is a “democratization of access … Continue reading

Summary: Vannevar Bush’s “As We May Think”

As Director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development for the U.S. Government, Vannevar Bush was one of the leaders on the Manhattan Project which developed the atomic bomb. For scientists, the Second World War was a time of discovery and mass technological and theoretical advancement. However, with the war ending, Vannevar Bush wondered … Continue reading

Why All The Hype About Hypertext?: Why Hypertexts Do Not Radically Shift The Way We Read Or Write

In his chapter, “A Brief History of Hypertext: Origins and Influences,” Andreas Kitzmann traces the development of hypertext, eventually concluding that “what is significant here is the manner in which [Hypertext] is being described and employed as a general paradigm with which to define and structure the very nature of expression itself, especially in terms … Continue reading

Response: The Garden of One Path – Print vs. Hypertexts

In the article “What Interactive Narratives Do That Print Narratives Cannot,” Jane Yellowlees-Douglas argues that hypertexts are, in effect, all interactive because one cannot unfold and participate in the story unless they have made certain decisions. She compelling asserts that hypertexts can do far more than printed texts due to the fact that the former … Continue reading

Summary: Jane Yellowlees-Douglas’ “What Interactive Narratives Do That Print Narratives Cannot.”

In this article, Yellowlees-Douglas talks about “hypertext” fiction and evaluates how interactive narratives differ from print narratives. In terms of reader experience, Yellowlees-Douglas begins by exploring the long-established definition of hypertexts as “nonsequential writing with reader-controlled links.” She then questions how exactly readers can participate in something non-sequentially, considering that language is inherently sequential. Hypertexts … Continue reading

Response: Hypertextuality–Beneficial or Damaging?

Ilana Snyder makes a very compelling argument about the changes in textuality and the growing values of hypertext in the chapter “Reconceiving Textuality.” However, there are negative and damaging aspects to hypertext that she never considers. Snyder completely disregards the value of authorial intent. Although, hypertextuality is appreciated because it is a “democratization of access … Continue reading