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fanfiction

This tag is associated with 5 posts

Response: The Secret Lives of Women: Cyberspace and Fan Erotica

In “Private Uses of Cyberspace: Women, Desire, and Fan Culture” Sharon Cumberland argues that cyberspace is a liberated arena for female authors of fanfiction erotica. Its ability to provide a personal outlet within a public forum allows women to explore and write about alternative ideas surrounding gender and sexuality, as well as “feelings and ideas … Continue reading

Summary: Henry Jenkins’ “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars?”

Henry Jenkins’ essay “Quentin Tarantino’s Star Wars?” describes the waves of regulation and independence experienced by the fanfiction culture behind the Star Wars franchise. He chronicles the struggles of Lucasfilm to determine its stance on fan adaptation and participation within the culture of its established intellectual property. Jenkins begins by discussing the Atomfilms contests that … Continue reading

Summary: Rhiannon Bury’s “Nice Girls Don’t Flame”

This chapter of Cyberspaces of Their Own talks about politeness in two fan-fiction mailing lists with mostly female members: the David Duchovny Estrogen Brigade (DDEB) and the Militant RayK Separatists (MRKS). Bury begins with a brief history of etiquette, explaining that women, when in mixed-sex groups, tend to introduce topics and support discussion rather than dominate it. Although … Continue reading

Response: “Unscholarly Faith” and Categorization as Invasions of Privacy in “Private Uses of Cyberspace”

Sharon Cumberland’s “Private Uses of Cyberspace: Women, Desire, and Fan Culture” examines the importance of gender roles and identification in a variety of fan fiction communities. The chapter suffers from Cumberland’s obsession over her inability to assert the factuality of her evidence and her desire to quantify and categorize the readers and writers within these … Continue reading

Response: 50 Shades of Heteronormativity: Sharon Cumberland’s Take on Female Fandoms

Sharon Cumberland’s “Private Uses of Cyberspace: Women, Desire and Fan Culture” focuses on the female-dominated subsections of fandom concerned with the production and distribution of fanfiction. These spaces, she contends, represent a way in which women “are using the paradox of cyberspace—personal privacy in a public forum—to explore feelings and ideas that were considered risky … Continue reading